Waxworms are the larvae of wax moths and get their name from eating bee’s wax in this wild. This blog will explain how to care for waxworms.

What should I keep waxworms in?

Waxworms usually arrive in a small, plastic tub with air holes in the top and woodchip inside. I tend to keep the waxworms in the container they arrive in as it’s nice and dark anyway. You can keep them in the refrigerator door to prolong their life, but room temperature is also fine.

Are waxworms a good food item?

View waxworms as the equivalent of a McDonald’s. Fine as a treat, but very fatty so don’t feed them too often. Some animals like them so much, they refuse other food, so be strict and only offer now and again.

What should I feed my waxworms?

If they are in the larvae stage, you don’t need to feed them as they live off their fat reserves.

What do waxworms turn in to?

The worms go through a webbing stage and basically looks like spider webs. They then turn dark brown as they cocoon, before turning into a moth. The moths are great to feed to arboreal animals who do not like feeding at floor level. Remove any black worms you find because these are dead.

How do I feed waxworms to my pet?

Just use tongs to pick them up, put them in a plastic bag with the vitamins or calcium, give them a shake and feed to your pet. You can get mealworm bowls that have a curved rim to stop the worms escaping, but you should remove any uneaten ones daily.

What are the downsides of keeping waxworms?

  • They are fatty, so not good value for money if you only have one reptile or amphibian.
  • If you haven’t removed any cocoons before they turn into moths, you might get a surprise when you open the tub.
  • Not all animals will eat moths.
  • If the container gets damp, they will perish quickly.
  • If you don’t remove the dead, black worms quickly, they can spread disease to the other waxworms.

If you want to read more, check out my Live food FAQs and to see how to look after different species;