Calci worms are the larvae of black soldier flies. They look like maggots, but are a rich in calcium and have level calcium to phosphorous ratio meaning they are a good staple.

Why are calci worms a good choice?

  • They are easy to look after
  • You don’t have to feed them
  • They don’t smell
  • They don’t make a noise
  • They don’t escape from feeding bowls
  • Most animals love them
  • They move and wriggle, which will catch your reptile or amphibians attention. If they aren’t moving much, pop them on a heat mat and they will come to life!
  • They are low in fat
  • They are high in lauric acid which has great antimicrobial properties
  • They come in a range of sizes, so good for most animals – The three sizes are suitable for tiny dart frogs to adult bearded dragons
  • Great for animals suffering from Metabolic bone disease
  • Great value for money – you get a lot in a tub!
Mango goes crazy for calci worms!

What should I keep my calci worms in?

I keep the worms in the tub they arrive in and you just need to keep the soil damp. They will turn brown as they age and can still be fed at this time – in fact, this is when they are at their highest nutritional value. They then moult into flies which can be fed, but I have never had a reptile who will eat them in this life stage.

These are Black Soldier flies – what the calc worms turn in to.

Keep them at room temperature, and they should last for about 3 weeks. The worms will burrow in the soil they arrive in, but you should put the tub in a dark place.

My main tip for keeping calci worms is many times I have had them escape from the containers they arrive in. To stop them getting out, all you need to do is put a weight on the lid – I use an old hamster bowl and it does the trick.

How should I feed calci worms to my pet?

As they are high in calcium and phosphorous, you don’t need to dust them with anything. Just use reptile tongs to pick them up (try not to pick up soil when you grab them) and put them in a bowl.

If you want to read more, check out my Live food FAQs and to see how to look after different species;